IPMS LogoInternational Plastic Modelers' Society / USA

IPMS LogoInternational Plastic Modelers' Society / USA

IPMS LogoIPMS/USA

IPMS LogoIPMS/USA

Tornado IDS/ECR

IPMS/USA Reviews - Wed, 07/15/2020 - 01:26
Product Image Review Author:  Michael Novosad Aviation Collectibles

Background and History--thanks to Wikipedia

The Panavia Tornado is a family of twin engine, variable-sweep multirole combat aircraft, jointly developed and manufactured by Italy, the United Kingdom, and West Germany. There are three primary Tornado variants: the Tornado IDS (interdiction/strike) fighter-bomber, the suppression of enemy defenses, Tornado ECR (electronic/combat/reconnaissance) and the Tornado ADV (air defense variant) interceptor aircraft.

The Tornado was developed and built by Panavia Aircraft GmbH, a tri-national consortium consisting of British Aerospace (previously British Aircraft Corporation), MBB of West Germany, and Aeritalia of Italy. It first flew on 14 August 1974 and was introduced into service in 1979-1980. Due to its multi-role design, it was able to replace several different fleets of aircraft in the adopting air forces. The Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF) became the only export operator of the Tornado in addition to the three original partner nations. A tri-nation training and evaluation unit operating from RAF Cottesmore, the Tri-National Tornado Training Establishment, maintained a level of international co-operation beyond the production stage. 

The Tornado was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF), Italian Air Force, and RSAF during the Gulf War of 1991, in which the Tornado conducted many low altitude penetrating strike missions. The Tornados of various services were also used in The Bosnian War, Kosovo War, Iraq War, in Libya during the Libyan Civil War, as well as smaller roles in Afghanistan, Yemen, and Syria. Including all variants, 992 aircraft were built.

Publication Format

The text is in Italian and English.  Almost all the pages include color images of Italian Air Force Tornados in flight or on the tarmac. There are two pages of color profiles of the standard camouflage scheme, desert camouflage and all grey Tornados.

Contents as Follows

  • Introduction--

The search for an aircraft to provide attack and reconnaissance for European air forces began in the mid-1960's. Several countries proceeded with the work independently, while others (Britain and France) formed a joint effort. Each effort took a different approach from variable sweep wings to supersonic VTOL (vertical/Short take-off and landing). Eventually several countries joined together in an effort to provide an aircraft that met the specified requirements.

  • Origin and Development-

This is the history of the development of the Tornado and the countries initially involved with their different requirements, culminating in the countries involved in the final design, construction of components, and assembly. Initial flights for the countries' prototypes are covered, included images of the very colorful prototype aircraft. Development and production was planned and as such nine prototype aircraft were planned: four British, three German and two Italian. The British first prototype flew on 8/14/74, the Italian first prototype flew on 12/5/75. Altogether until the summer of 1998, 989 Tornados would be built in all models and versions 

  • In Service with Italian Air Force-

This is a major part of this publication and includes several color images of Italian Tornados in flight and on the tarmac. Tornados are shown in the all grey and camouflage schemes. There are also images of very colorful special paint schemes as well as various underwing stores and weapons carried by Tornados in Italian service.

  • Tornado MLU- 

By 2002 the Italian Tornados were beginning to show their age and were entered into the IT MLU (Mid-Life Update). The upgrades are identified in this section which shows the ability of the original aircraft design to be periodically updated to meet new conditions and accept new technology and equipment. 

  • Tornado at War-

Several pages are dedicated to the various wars where Italian Tornados have participated. Color images are included.

  • Modelers' Notes-

Seven pages offer information on kits available from several manufactures in the various scales as well as colors and paint manufacturers appropriate to Italian Tornados. One page is dedicated to the pilot's instrument panel. Two pages contain color detail images that would be informative to the scale modeler.

  • Technical Data-

Here we have a single page of three schedules that address technical data, armament and sensors, and serial numbers. The armament and sensors data should prove informative for those who wish to model an Italian Tornado. 

  • Acknowledgements and Bibliography-

These are primarily Italian sources.

Conclusion

The many color images of Italian Tornados should be useful tools to the scale modeler wishing to build an Italian or other user Tornado,  The images are especially useful for details, weapons, and color schemes used.  If you are an enthusiast of modern aircraft this publication will be equally useful and enjoyable. A great addition to anyone's reference library.  

I wish to thank Casemate Publications and IMPS/USA for the opportunity to review this publication Recommended.

Russian Medium Tank T-55

IPMS/USA Reviews - Wed, 07/15/2020 - 00:03
Product Image Review Author:  Patrick Brown Tamiya USA

Bottom Line Up Front: Tamiya breaks new ground with the first large production injection T-55 in 1/48 scale.  Tamiya already has an impressive line of excellent 1/48 scale armor kits and this will likely prove to be one of their most popular offerings.  This kit delivers everything we have come to expect from Tamiya; excellent detail, brilliant engineering and interesting subjects.  

History

From the mid-1950s, the T-55 was the main tank of the Soviet Army, armies of the Warsaw Pact countries, and many others.  T-55s have been involved in many of the world's armed conflicts since the later part of the 20th century. The T-55's first appearance in the West around the period of the 1950s (then the beginning of the Cold War) spurred the United Kingdom to develop a new tank gun, the Royal Ordnance L7, and the United States to develop the M60 Patton.  The T-55 series remain in use by up to 50 other armies worldwide, some having received sophisticated retrofitting.

Vital Statistics and Scores

Detail: 4.5 out of 5
Tamiya has packed a lot of 1/35 scale level of detail into this 1/48 scale kit.  The DShK heavy machine gun is really a gem.  The grips are a little simplified, but easy to fix if desired.  The cast turret has a wonderful in-scale texture that really pops when painted and weathered.  Tamiya continues to up their game in the figure department with a tight little commander figure.  The figure detail is good and he is in a nice, natural pose.  The power supply lines to the infrared search lights are molded on to the turret, which is to be expected in this smaller scale.  This is also easily fixed if so desired.  Another very nice delicate detail is the brush guard over the bow headlight.

There are a few deletions that are unfortunate, but completely understandable given the smaller scale.  Most T-55s have U shaped tie-downs on the turret.  These are omitted in this kit.  Another missed details, which is common to many T-55 kits, is the fuel lines on the external fuel tanks.  

The only other very small issue was the lack of a radio antenna.  There is a mount for one but no antenna.  

Engineering: 5+ out of 5
We've come to take it for granted that Tamiya's engineering is second to none.  No surprises here.  Tamiya has taken one more step away from the conventional tub hull construction with this kit, providing a flat-pack slab hull that comes in 4 main parts.  Thankfully Tamiya seems to have completely abandoned the die-cast metal tub hull.  They still do provide two metal weights to give the completed model some heft and seem less toy-like.  The road wheels are comprised of two pieces and a poly cap.  

The link and length tracks have faint ejector pin marks which are very easy to clean up.  There are some other ejector marks and sprue gates in what I initially thought were inconvenient locations.  After cleaning the parts up, however I found that Tamiya planned ahead and has those parts positioned on the finished kit so that their placement effectively hides the marred spots.  Hats off to Mr. Tamiya's engineer staff!

Fit: 5+ out of 5
There were absolutely no fit issues with this kit.  Nada.  The clever engineering, combined with the perfect fit of each part and assembly made this kit an absolute joy.  It took me about two hours to complete all of the steps in the assembly portion, including the tracks, and I didn't rush.  The suspension and road wheels fit to such a tight tolerance that getting them all aligned straight (the great bugaboo with all tracked vehicle models) happened perfectly all on its own.  

There are only two places on this kit where there are seams you will need to worry about.  One is on the bore evacuator.  The barrel is one piece, which is very nice, but the sleeve over the evacuator is two piece and while it fits like a dream, it still leaves seams on the top and bottom that need to be filled.  The other seams are on the rear fuel tanks.  This is one area on the kit that might cause some problems.  The holding straps for the two-piece tanks are molded in such a way that there are seams to fill which are very difficult to get to.  You will want a small file that can get into a 3mm space.

Instructions: 5 out of 5
Tamiya gives you their standard, well thought out, well-illustrated, multi-lingual instruction sheet.   They go the extra mile with a nice data sheet that gives you some historical background on the T-55 in four different languages.  There are 22 steps in the instructions but that's only because they break it down to assembling only four or five parts in each step.  It will be very difficult to get lost with these directions.

Markings: 2.5 out of 5
The decal sheet provided has markings for one unidentified vehicle which I can only assume is from a Soviet Army unit.  The markings they chose looked typically Soviet Cold War, but with how widely the T-55 has seen service the world over, I was a very disappointed by the limited selection.  Like I said above though, just wait a little while and we will see a flood of aftermarket options.

If this kit has a weak point it's the decals.  Waterslide decals seem to be Tamiya's Achilles heel, which leaves me scratching my head since they have such high standards everywhere else. The decals have great color and are always in perfect register, but they are thick, thick, thick!  Even if they nestle down over raised detail they obviously show as an adhesive mark from almost any angle.  It's very difficult to get that "painted on" look with Tamiya decals.  

Conclusion
This kit put a great big smile on my face.  For this guy who normally works in 1/35 scale, this was something new and fresh.  It's an interesting, good-looking subject and I can't wait to see all the aftermarket options that are sure to come.  I can't recommend it highly enough.

Many thanks to Tamiya and IPMS USA for the pre-release review sample.

Ammo by Mig Jimenez Shaders – Gray and Blue colors

IPMS/USA Reviews - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 12:59
Product Image Review Author:  Scott Hollingshead AMMO by Mig Jimenez

A recent arrival for the Review Corps were Shaders from Ammo by Mig Jimenez, which are a unique addition for modelers of just about anything.  For this review in particular, I was provided with five of the colors including Light Gray (0856), Navy Gray (0857), Light Blue (0860), Marine Blue (0861), and Night Blue (0862).  The full line consists of 20 different colors.  The Shaders are unique to begin with as they are packaged in 10ml bottles, so they are about half the size of a typical bottle of acrylic paint.  Shaders do not require shaking prior to use (they are about the consistency of ink), and they can be mixed to create different shades, and may be thinned with water if desired.

 

For this review I used only two drops of each of my five Shaders, and this was enough of the product to cover approximately 2 square inches.  I primed the inside of an upper scrap fuselage with Stynylrez White, Gray, Metal, and Blue-Gray, leaving a small strip of bare plastic between colors.  I used pieces of Post-it notes to mask over the Shaders with no issues of lifting.  These colors do need to be over sprayed with a clear coat once they are dry in order to seal them.

 

I mentioned these as being useful to modelers of just about anything, so here are some potential uses:

  • Panel lines on aircraft
  • Shadows on vehicles or buildings
  • Shading (adding tonal variations to paint)
  • Representing sheer fabrics on figures
  • Filters for any subject (with the advantage of being applied with an airbrush)

In watching some available YouTube videos, aircraft, armor, railroad buildings, figure, and Gundam kits are all mentioned.

 

Based on an early YouTube video on the Shaders as well as a new video added recently in English, here are some things to keep in mind when using this product.

  • Start with light shades (you can only make base colors darker with these).
  • Shaders are meant to be applied with an airbrush.
  • Only a few drops are needed to cover a large area.
  • Mig recommends having decals in place before using the Shaders.
  • Excess accumulation will result in a glossy appearance.
  • Shaders are meant to be applied over a flat finish.
  • If a mistake is made, these colors may be wiped off with water.
  • If adding more layers of Shaders, flat coat the underlying layer first.
  • Coat the Shaders with a gloss or semi-gloss coat prior to adding washes.
  • Your airbrush can be cleaned with water.

 

My plusses are the unique finishes that you can obtain with the Shaders whether adding shadows, panels of different tones, color differences along panel lines, or creating a new color on a piece of plastic.  The unique bottle design is intentional so that these are not confused with other acrylic paints as these are not intended to be used as base colors.  With a nice range of colors, you can achieve different effects, and you can easily mix even more colors yourself.  I have no minuses to mention with the Shaders.

 

In conclusion, I would highly recommend these paints to anyone wanting to add another option when creating shadows, panels with different tones, or any other effect mentioned.  Mig mentions that he created the Shaders to make modeling easier, and he hit the mark with this product.  Modelers with some experience with their airbrush should have no issues with using the Shaders.

 

I would like to thank the folks at Ammo by Mig Jimenez for being gracious enough to provide these Shaders to the IPMS-USA for review!  Thanks to Phil Peterson for running the Review Corps along with our Post Master Bill, and the other folks behind the scenes publishing the reviews.  Finally, my sincere appreciation to all who take the time to read this.

 

Ammo by Mig Jimenez Shaders – Gray and Blue colors

IPMS/USA Reviews - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 12:57
Product Image Review Author:  Scott Hollingshead AMMO by Mig Jimenez

A recent arrival for the Review Corps were Shaders from Ammo by Mig Jimenez, which are a unique addition for modelers of just about anything.  For this review in particular, I was provided with five of the colors including Light Gray (0856), Navy Gray (0857), Light Blue (0860), Marine Blue (0861), and Night Blue (0862).  The full line consists of 20 different colors.  The Shaders are unique to begin with as they are packaged in 10ml bottles, so they are about half the size of a typical bottle of acrylic paint.  Shaders do not require shaking prior to use (they are about the consistency of ink), and they can be mixed to create different shades, and may be thinned with water if desired.

 

For this review I used only two drops of each of my five Shaders, and this was enough of the product to cover approximately 2 square inches.  I primed the inside of an upper scrap fuselage with Stynylrez White, Gray, Metal, and Blue-Gray, leaving a small strip of bare plastic between colors.  I used pieces of Post-it notes to mask over the Shaders with no issues of lifting.  These colors do need to be over sprayed with a clear coat once they are dry in order to seal them.

 

I mentioned these as being useful to modelers of just about anything, so here are some potential uses:

  • Panel lines on aircraft
  • Shadows on vehicles or buildings
  • Shading (adding tonal variations to paint)
  • Representing sheer fabrics on figures
  • Filters for any subject (with the advantage of being applied with an airbrush)

In watching some available YouTube videos, aircraft, armor, railroad buildings, figure, and Gundam kits are all mentioned.

 

Based on an early YouTube video on the Shaders as well as a new video added recently in English, here are some things to keep in mind when using this product.

  • Start with light shades (you can only make base colors darker with these).
  • Shaders are meant to be applied with an airbrush.
  • Only a few drops are needed to cover a large area.
  • Mig recommends having decals in place before using the Shaders.
  • Excess accumulation will result in a glossy appearance.
  • Shaders are meant to be applied over a flat finish.
  • If a mistake is made, these colors may be wiped off with water.
  • If adding more layers of Shaders, flat coat the underlying layer first.
  • Coat the Shaders with a gloss or semi-gloss coat prior to adding washes.
  • Your airbrush can be cleaned with water.

 

My plusses are the unique finishes that you can obtain with the Shaders whether adding shadows, panels of different tones, color differences along panel lines, or creating a new color on a piece of plastic.  The unique bottle design is intentional so that these are not confused with other acrylic paints as these are not intended to be used as base colors.  With a nice range of colors, you can achieve different effects, and you can easily mix even more colors yourself.  I have no minuses to mention with the Shaders.

 

In conclusion, I would highly recommend these paints to anyone wanting to add another option when creating shadows, panels with different tones, or any other effect mentioned.  Mig mentions that he created the Shaders to make modeling easier, and he hit the mark with this product.  Modelers with some experience with their airbrush should have no issues with using the Shaders.

 

I would like to thank the folks at Ammo by Mig Jimenez for being gracious enough to provide these Shaders to the IPMS-USA for review!  Thanks to Phil Peterson for running the Review Corps along with our Post Master Bill, and the other folks behind the scenes publishing the reviews.  Finally, my sincere appreciation to all who take the time to read this.

 

The Doolittle Raid, Images of Aviation

IPMS/USA Reviews - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 12:44
Product Image Review Author:  Bill O'Malley Pen & Sword

Introduction

On 1 April 1942, less than four months after the world had been stunned by the attack upon Pearl Harbor, sixteen US aircraft took to the skies to exact retribution. Their objective was not merely to attack Japan, but to bomb its capital. The raid was more successful in its moral impact on shaking the Japanese sense of invulnerability than in its physical damage to the targets. The Doolittle Raid tells the story of the preparations for the raid, descriptions of each of the 16 crews and their outcome, and the aftermath of the raid.

The book is part of Pen & Sword's Images of Aviation Series and is profusely illustrated with quality B&W photos. The photos create vivid images of the men, aircraft, and ships involved in the raid. Each crew and member of the Raiders is described in text and photos to personalize the people involved. The text provides introductions to each phase of the operation, and captions clearly describe each of the photos.

Contents

Part I - Striking Back

  • Chapter 1 Introduction - Describes developing the original idea, planning the raid, and preparation of the aircraft
  • Chapter 2 Making it Happen - The selection of volunteers and their training for the raid.
  • Chapter 3 All at Sea - Extensive photos describe the fleet of ships and preparations on the aircraft carrier Hornet en route to the launch of the aircraft.

Part II - Target Japan

  • Saturday, 18 April 1942 - Describes final on-board preparations and launching of the 16 B-25s on the day of the raid.
  • Crews 1 thru 16 - Includes photos of each crew, a description of their mission, and their fate after the raid.

Part III - The Aftermath

  • Chapter 4 War Crimes - A brief description of the trial of Japanese officials charged with torture of some of the Raider crews.
  • Chapter 5 The Post-Raid Assessment - Describes how word of the raid came out afterward, assessment & impact of the raid, and various recognition and award ceremonies after the raid.
  • Chapter 6 Recreating History - 50 years after the raid, on April 18, 1992, two B-25s launched off the USS Ranger (CV-61) to mark the 50th anniversary of the Doolittle raid.
  • References and Notes

Summary

The Doolittle Raid provides an intimate connection to the men who volunteered and dedicated themselves to this important mission. The raid lifted the spirit of Americans who had previously only experienced defeat and struck a blow to the moral of the Japanese people. The book tells a compelling story of the heroic actions taking by the volunteer Raiders and how the raid started to turn the tide of the war in America's favor. The text is well written and an easy read. The numerous photos are clear and very descriptive of the men, planes, and ships taking part in the raid. Detailed statistics are included for the 16 aircraft in the raid.

This book is an excellent narrative and fascinating collection of photos on the remarkable actions of the Doolittle Raiders. Thanks to Pen & Sword for publishing this awesome book, and thanks to Casemate for providing a review sample to IPMS.

F6F-3 Hellcat "VF-27 USS Princeton"

IPMS/USA Reviews - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 09:58
Product Image Review Author:  Scott Hollingshead Platz

Platz Hobby produces a number of kits in 1/144 scale (currently 334 to be exact), and I was fortunate enough to receive this two-plane kit for review. In addition to the parts for two aircraft there are markings for three different planes included. Construction was quick, and the detail is very good for this scale. Modelers familiar with working with small parts should not have issues building this release, and I would highly recommend it.

There have been many releases of the F6F in its variants over the years, so I probably do not need to mention much more on the history of a plane that had over 10,000 copies released during WWII. The three goals of the Hellcat were that it had to be better than the planes it would face, that it could be built quickly in large numbers, and that it could be easily mastered by the pilots. Grumman answered the call with what was likely the definitive U.S. Navy carrier-borne fighter of the war.

This release from Platz contains a single light gray sprue along with two clear sprues for each plane. While an additional F6F-5 canopy is provided for each plane, the markings are for the dash 3 variant. Speaking of the markings, they are made by Cartograf and provide the famous "cat mouth" marking of VF-27 assigned to the USS Princeton in May, 1944 as well as a plane from VF-9 aboard the USS Essex in 1944, and a VF-4 plane in 1943 (no ship mentioned). The VF-27 and VF-9 planes are in the two-tone blue scheme with a white underside while the VF-4 plane is blue gray over light gray.

Construction is straight forward, and the only change I made was to add the cockpit seat and control panel prior to gluing the fuselage halves together. While there were what appear to be mold release buttons on the seats, and there is no decal for the control panel, they are very difficult to see once the canopy is in place and the frames are painted. I did have to play with the fit of the canopy a little and the fuel tank supports may need moved slightly to match up to the fuselage, but these are not daunting tasks. I also had to replace the rear antenna on both planes with a piece of wire as I managed to break them off during construction on one plane, and during painting of the second plane. I used a piece of Uschi 0.001 inch rigging material for the aerial on the VF-27 plane and a piece of black hair (used for extensions) for the VF-9 plane.

I used Stynylrez White primer for the underside as well as Black for the propeller, and Model Master Acryl for the Dark Blue and Intermediate Blue. For the VF-27 plane, I found that Hataka lacquer Insignia Red best matched the cat mouth red as you must paint the intake area yourself. I also used Model Master Lacquer Silver for the spinner on the VF-27 plane.

My hits for this release are the level of detail for the scale, the clean moldings and tight fits, and the great markings. While I would not call them misses, I would have liked a decal for the control panel, and the canopy fit was not difficult to overcome, but did not match the fits of the other parts in the kit. Absolutely no filler was required for either plane.

As mentioned up front, I would highly recommend this kit to modelers wanting to add a couple of F6F-3 planes to their 1/144 collection, especially one from VF-27 with a cat mouth. Modelers with experience in working with small parts should have no issues with building this kit and adding the decals.

I would like to thank the folks at Platz Hobby for providing this kit to the IPMS-USA Review Corps for assessment, and to Phil Peterson for leading the Review Corps, and allowing me to perform this review. I would also send out kudos to all of the folks behind the scenes at the Review Corps who help John with his efforts, and as always, my sincere appreciation goes out to all the folks who take the time to read my comments.

Fairey Swordfish, Mk. I, II, III, IV, Floatplane

IPMS/USA Reviews - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 08:57
Product Image Review Author:  Brian R. Baker Kagero Publishing History

The Fairey Swordfish was an aircraft that, although appearing to be obsolete at the outbreak of World War II, achieved a combat record far in excess of what anyone expected. A large biplane, the type was used as a torpedo bomber, reconnaissance aircraft, anti-submarine type, and trainer by Commonwealth air forces and navies. Later versions were equipped with floats for catapult launching from warships, and the type routinely operated from Royal Navy carriers. In 1943, the type was equipped with radar, and mounted rockets under the wings for use against enemy warships and submarines. As long as they operated in areas where few enemy fighters were present, they could be very effective.

The Book

The book provides a set of drawings for all of the major versions of the Swordfish, ranging from Mk. I through Mk. IV plus the floatplane versions. There is no text explaining the features, but the drawings tell the story. The drawings show both side views, front view, upper and lower views, and views with the wings folded. There is a lot of information here for the modeler, and the drawings are provided in two scales.

In addition, there are ten color side views of various Mk. I and Mk. II aircraft in various color schemes, representing the major marking varieties used on this aircraft during its combat career. Unfortunately, these are only side views, and the plan view camouflage patterns are not given, although this information is available in other publications.

Problems

A major problem with this publication is that the majority of the views of the aircraft are listed as being in 1/72 scale. The two extra sheets include 1/48 scale drawings. When I first looked through the book, it seemed that the views were large for that scale, and after measuring, I found that the scale was somewhat larger than 1/72, and when I placed a 1/72 scale Matchbox model of the Swordfish over the drawing, the model was somewhat smaller. This would only be a problem in determining the size of the interior details, and model scales tend to be quite consistent. Other than that, it is an excellent publication, and provides all the information you would need for doing a super-detailed Swordfish model in either 1/72 of 1/48 scale.

As far as dimensions go, here is some information: (Dimensions are approximate)

 

Aircraft 1/1 1/48 1/72 Span 45' 6" 11.25" (Book 12.75") 7.58" (Book 9.5") Length 35' 8" 9" (Book 10.5") 6.5" (Book 7.5")

So, in effect, the drawings in the book are slightly larger than stated scale. However, they are highly detailed, and would be very useful to someone wanting to model this aircraft in either of these scales.

Recommendation

Aside from the scale problem, this will be a very useful publication for any serious modeler. Recommended with reservations. Perhaps a second edition would solve this problem.

2021 FORD BRONCO REVEALED: A CHANCE FOR A SCALE MODEL?

Scale Model News - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 08:04


CAR FANS CAN APPLAUD Ford for bringing back the Bronco. The 2021 Bronco comes in plenty of variations, including our favourite doors-off open version.
Read more »
Categories: News

Dry-fit Review: 1/32nd scale Junkers EF-126/EF-127 from Das Werk

The Modelling News - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 06:56
The futuristic Junkers EF-126/EF-127 fits into all of the late-WWII mythoi of German technical superiority and "what-if" fans everywhere in modelling. This new kit from Das Werk provides us with this 32nd scale kit in several alternative tailed incarnations. Gary Wickham has taken it on in a dry-build to show you just what the kit builds up like and the quality awaiting you perspective owners of the new "Werk"...Read on... »

AFV Club Sd.Kfz.251/9 Ausf D (Early)

IPMS/USA Reviews - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 01:03
Product Image Review Author:  Michael Novosad AFV Club

Brief History from Wikipedia

The Sd.Kfz. 251 halftrack was a World War I German armored fighting vehicle designed by the Hanamag company, based on its earlier unarmored Sd. Kfz 11 vehicle. The Sd.Kfz. 251 was designed to transport the Panzergrenadier (German mechanized infantry) into battle. Sd.Kfz. 251s were the most widely produced German halftracks of the war, with at least 15,252 vehicles and variants produced by seven manufacturers. Some sources state that the Sd.Kfz. 251 was commonly referred to simply as "Hanomags" by both German and Allied soldiers after the manufacturer of the vehicle; this has been questioned, and may have been only a postwar label. German officers referred to them as SPW (Schutzenpanzerwagen, or armored infantry vehicle) in their daily orders and memoirs. 

Sd.Kfz. 251/9 - Schutzenpanzerwagen (7.5 cm KwK37). Equipped with a 75 mm L/24 low velocity gun, using the same pedestal gun mount employed on the Stug IIII. Nicknamed "Stummel" ("stump"). In 1944, a revised modular gun mount was introduced to facilitate production that also incorporated a coaxial MG42. This universal gun mount was also used to create the Sd.Kfz. 250/8 variant and the Sd.Kfz.234/3.

The Kit and What is in the Box

There are eight plastic bags containing ten plastic sprues in three different colors. a spun aluminum gun barrel, a small PE fret, and a pair of vinyl tracks. A small decal sheet is also provided.

Also included is a nominal 8" by 12" color box art picture suitable for framing or just tacking to the wall for color and front end detailing reference.

The Instructions

The instructions are provided in a 16-page, glossy paper booklet. The cover page includes small box art image and a brief history of the vehicle.  Page 2 has a color list noting six paint choices from four different manufacturers. The bottom of the page has illustration for four options of workable track available from AFV Club. 

Construction is detailed from page 3 through page 12 in 25 steps. Each step is shown in exploded views and several smaller views with part numbers noted, and paint colors sometimes noted. The parts list is shown on page 13 with instructions noted for obtaining replacement parts. The tiny gun barrel was included in the plastic bag with sprue "DD". 

The last three pages show in color four camouflage schemes for this vehicle. Reading the instructions and planning the painting sequence is important to complete the assembly.

Construction

Open top military vehicles often present some real challenges when it comes to painting and this kit is no exception. I painted the various subassemblies in a progressive manner for this build/review. 

Lower Hull-In the second part of Step 1 the two hull sides are fitted to the lower chassis.  Each hull side has three tabs that fit into slots in the chassis.  Either some of the slots were too small or the tabs too large.  I enlarged the holes slightly to accommodate the tabs and things began to fit in place, but it was still a bit tight. Same for the rear axle; the forward openings needed to be enlarged slightly before the axle would fit in place. Once the solvent was applied at the tabs, I used finger pressure to force the parts together and felt movement as the tabs slid into place. Any misfit here would reflect into future assembly.

Step 2 addresses the drive sprocket that consists of an inner and exterior sides. The parts have full circular teeth on each half that intermesh on the inside of the mating surfaces.  Here too we have another tight fit.  Using finger pressure I compressed the parts, applied the solvent all the way around, and applied more pressure until the parts compressed and the teeth on both side fit together.

In Step 9 several items are fitted to the angled wall on the left side. Raised lines are provided to locate the various items, however there are more outlines than equipment to be mounted. I used a microchisel to eliminate all the lines and just winged the locations when fixing the parts in place. When mounted the two interior side storage bins there were no raised locators to help in placement.

The lower hull crew compartment was primed and painted at this point in the assembly.

Upper Hull-The engine compartment doors, parts D8 and D9 did not fit the opening; one side was a bit too wide. I trimmed the sides and hinges for a better fit and shimmed the hood opening shelf at the door junction with .010" plastic strip to prevent the doors from setting too low in the opening. There was a bit of effort to get the parts to fit just right. In the end it was close but not perfect.

Hull Exterior-The exterior hull storage compartments are molded with one door closed and two open with separate doors that can be fitted open or closed.  However, the knuckles on the left side door (parts D34) piano hinges and those on the left side boxes are not alternating but are molded opposed.  Therefore, the doors will not fit in either an open or closed configuration as shown in the instructions. Parts D34 will however fit on the right side, while door parts D33 shown fitted on the right side will fit on the left side. In either case the doors will not close flush with the box sides unless the interior ledge on parts D10 and D11 is removed.

When it came time to fit the two long storage compartments on either side of the upper hull I found there were no positive locators to help with the fit. I temporarily taped the upper and lower hulls together, and using the side profiles show in the instructions as a guide I fitted the compartments in place as best I could and applied the solvent. Neither was a good fit and some filling would be required.

The upper hull crew compartment interior was primed and painted at this point in the assembly.

75 mm L/24 low velocity gun-The construction of the main armament was addressed in multiple steps in the instructions and was the most complicated work in the assembly.  I managed to lose two of the smaller parts during the work but forged ahead with the gun undaunted.

This subassembly was primed and painted at this point.

Hull Finishing Touches-Fitting the top hull to the bottom assembly was problematic. I hooked the front of the top portion to the bottom of the hull and cemented them together, leaving the rest of the assembly loose, hoping to fit everything together once the solvent had cured. At this point the ill-fitting joins were evident. The joins were fitted and glued progressively until the top and bottom were assembled.  Several significant gaps were apparent. These were filled with acrylic putty.

Tracks-First I washed the vinyl tracks in warm water with a drop of Dawn detergent using an old toothbrush to scrub all the nooks and crannies. The tracks were rinsed in clear water and set aside to dry overnight.

The tracks are handed: the right side has a round tab and the left a square tab.  Both tabs were left is place until after the painting was complete to avoid mixing them. The 251 tracks have 56 links on the right side while the left has 55 links.  This information was Found in Panzer Tracts No 15-2.

The tracks were then painted with a mix of Tamiya acrylics and allowed to dry for 24 hours before gluing the ends together. Quick-setting super glue was used to form the loop. Plastic solvent had no effect on the tracks. Each loop fit around the road wheels and sprockets with no issues, however I had to glue the tracks to the tops and bottoms of the road wheels for a more realistic appearance. 

Now the major problem: with the tracks in place and the model placed on a flat surface, I found the two front wheels suspended about a quarter inch above the surface. Not sure how to address that problem at this stage in the work.

Painting

As the kit has three different colors of plastic parts and some PE parts I primed the model with a single color to unify the base plastic.  I decanted Tamiya grey primer and thinned it with Mr. Color Leveling thinner.  This was applied with an airbrush and the primer was allowed to cure for 24 hours before continuing.

The open crew compartment interior had been painted previously and was masked before the exterior was painted.

Decals

There are decal markings for five vehicles, counting the box art.  I chose "442" as the subject for this build.  This vehicle has "442" on the sides and rear, and that was it for markings.  Simple.   The model was given a few coats of clear gloss as a base for the decals and pin wash. The decals loosened from the backing sheet within a few minutes after being dipped in warm water.  Each of the side numbers are attached to the center number by a narrow band of carrier film, so care is required when sliding the decal off the backer onto the model's surface.  The numbers did align with little effort. MicroSet and MicroSol were used to fix the decals in place.  When dry the carrier film is virtually invisible.

The model was finished with a coat of Model Master clear flat acryl. Done!

Conclusion

The most significant challenge was the assembly of the top of the vehicle was the lower hull subassembly. I could not determine where the subassemblies went wrong, but the fit was certainly off. Shimming with plastic strips, filling with putty, and sanding proved to be the answer to eliminating most of the gaps.  More work than should have been required. 

Another of the annoying aspects of this kit was the raised ejector pin stubs that are often located on opposing mounting surfaces of some parts.  This is especially true of the smaller parts.  This is a problem that is certainly not insurmountable but requires time and effort to address. The instructions are not always clear for the placement of some parts, and therefore some study and care is required to get everything to fit. Several parts have no positive locators and require effort to determine the correct placement. 

I found a few parts with flash, but nothing of consequence.  Some of the parts are too thick, such as the open storage boxes in the exposed crew compartment. There are some ill-fitting parts, but again those were easily corrected.

This model has potential and will require attention and patience to complete.

I wish to thank AFV Club and IPMS USA for the opportunity to build and review this kit. 

: Atlantis White-Fruehauf gas truck

IPMS/USA Reviews - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 00:27
Product Image Review Author:  Rod Lees Atlantis Model Company

IPMS/USA appreciates the continued support of Atlantis Models for supporting the IPMS USA reviewer corps with another step back in time for us old guys!

Atlantis Models continues their release schedule of one more kit I did not remember being on the shelves in my younger years.  This Tractor/Trailer is advertised as a multiple use model, for both civilian and Military use.  Included in the box are bright green injection molded parts, and a decal sheet for "Dino the Dinosaur", company mascot for the Sinclair oil company. 

I found this particularly intriguing, as one of my favorite gasoline companies when I was living in Rapid City, South Dakota was Sinclair oil company with it's trademark Dino the dinosaur.  If you are familiar with the "Dinosaur park" on one of the hilltops overlooking "Bacon Park" in Rapid city, you know their largest concrete statue of the many dinosaurs memorialized from the "badlands" fossils found to the East of Rapid City is a large Brontosaur, or "Dino". 

Yes, I'm easily amused.  And used to have a large inflatable "Dino" as well.  Who would not envy such a cool toy? 

 

On to the kit...  The parts are extremely well detailed, accurate in fit, and produce one model.  The fuel tanker trailer is removable, and has opening doors on the side to access the fuel valves and distribution manifold.  Fuel lines are prevalent on the underside of the trailer, and the lower chassis includes forward extended trailer roller braces for assisting connection to the fifth wheel in real life, and an eight tire rolling truck with brake accumulators and leaf spring details. 

The tank fits perfectly onto the lower trailer chassis, with a ladder leading to the six upper tank maintenance covers.  The ladder for the back of the tank is a mandatory accessory for tank inspection and filling. Detail on the tail of the trailer includes brake lights and turn signal lights. 

.  The Tractor is a cab-over, and if you construct it correctly during assembly, it will hinge forward to allow access to a detailed engine, transmission, battery, and basic chassis with dual rear wheels under the fifth wheel plate.  A steering wheel, bench seats, and a couple of instrument recessions are included, although (common at the time) no clear parts are included.  Two rear view mirrors and one set of horns (which I drilled out with a #11 blade) for the cab roof are also provided

 

After painting the model overall with flat black spray automotive primer, I filled in a few sink marks on the fuel tank sides, and then carefully (and lightly) sprayed several light coats of yellow gloss paint over the entire model.  I had masked off the cab interior, and ended up touching up the black paint inside.  Wheels off for this part!

 

Let's spend a moment on the wheels and tires.  There are 14 of these boogers, and if you dislike repetitive repair as much as I do, you will be crawling the walls with these.  The wheels were single part items, with detailed wheel faces for the outer wheel and tire assemblies.  I had painted them overall yellow, and realized afterwards I should have masked the tires first, because gloss paint over flat primer without misting it on will result in (1) paint film shrinkage and (2) cracks in the gloss color coat.  Several of the tires therefore had radial cracks in the flat black applied over the tires, requiring minute but difficult touch up.   This is just an "old man who knows better by experience" afterthought for y'all for future efforts.   I had used a circle cutter for the first time to make yellow masking tape discs to mask off the wheels, and that part actually worked pretty well.  

After the vehicle chassis had dried a few days, I pressed the wheels on the axles.  In retrospect I'd HIGHLY recommend you test fit first to ensure they will press over the axle boss... I almost destroyed the trailer with the amount of pressure I applied, and this was not necessary. 

Using some clear plastic from a vacform blister container from Eduard (save these for "free" clear sheets!) ensured I had glass in the rear and side cab locations.  I left the door panel glass "rolled down" (you younger guys don't know what I am talking about, huh?) and tried to "force form" a windshield.  No go... but it's mostly there. 

You may want to do this yourself with a vacform and rudimentary balsa armature.  But maybe not.  I don't see any aftermarket showing up over this anytime soon.

I did not apply the decals, as I'm still searching for detail pictures showing this truck being used on a flight line with large aircraft.  In the interim, I have a 1/48 tanker to use for a visiting B-36 to be refueled.  My experience with Atlantis decals is they work great... but I don't need a Sinclair decal on my AGE fuel truck. 

 

Well done Atlantis, and please continue to bring out the older kits.   I'm preordering when possible... and the prices are particularly welcome, especially in cases such as the T-56 Turboprop... It's great fun to enjoy the hobby again with some good-'ol old time modeling. 

: Atlantis White-Fruehauf gas truck

IPMS/USA Reviews - Tue, 07/14/2020 - 00:26
Product Image Review Author:  Rod Lees Atlantis Model Company

IPMS/USA appreciates the continued support of Atlantis Models for supporting the IPMS USA reviewer corps with another step back in time for us old guys!

Atlantis Models continues their release schedule of one more kit I did not remember being on the shelves in my younger years.  This Tractor/Trailer is advertised as a multiple use model, for both civilian and Military use.  Included in the box are bright green injection molded parts, and a decal sheet for "Dino the Dinosaur", company mascot for the Sinclair oil company. 

I found this particularly intriguing, as one of my favorite gasoline companies when I was living in Rapid City, South Dakota was Sinclair oil company with it's trademark Dino the dinosaur.  If you are familiar with the "Dinosaur park" on one of the hilltops overlooking "Bacon Park" in Rapid city, you know their largest concrete statue of the many dinosaurs memorialized from the "badlands" fossils found to the East of Rapid City is a large Brontosaur, or "Dino". 

Yes, I'm easily amused.  And used to have a large inflatable "Dino" as well.  Who would not envy such a cool toy? 

 

On to the kit...  The parts are extremely well detailed, accurate in fit, and produce one model.  The fuel tanker trailer is removable, and has opening doors on the side to access the fuel valves and distribution manifold.  Fuel lines are prevalent on the underside of the trailer, and the lower chassis includes forward extended trailer roller braces for assisting connection to the fifth wheel in real life, and an eight tire rolling truck with brake accumulators and leaf spring details. 

The tank fits perfectly onto the lower trailer chassis, with a ladder leading to the six upper tank maintenance covers.  The ladder for the back of the tank is a mandatory accessory for tank inspection and filling. Detail on the tail of the trailer includes brake lights and turn signal lights. 

.  The Tractor is a cab-over, and if you construct it correctly during assembly, it will hinge forward to allow access to a detailed engine, transmission, battery, and basic chassis with dual rear wheels under the fifth wheel plate.  A steering wheel, bench seats, and a couple of instrument recessions are included, although (common at the time) no clear parts are included.  Two rear view mirrors and one set of horns (which I drilled out with a #11 blade) for the cab roof are also provided

 

After painting the model overall with flat black spray automotive primer, I filled in a few sink marks on the fuel tank sides, and then carefully (and lightly) sprayed several light coats of yellow gloss paint over the entire model.  I had masked off the cab interior, and ended up touching up the black paint inside.  Wheels off for this part!

 

Let's spend a moment on the wheels and tires.  There are 14 of these boogers, and if you dislike repetitive repair as much as I do, you will be crawling the walls with these.  The wheels were single part items, with detailed wheel faces for the outer wheel and tire assemblies.  I had painted them overall yellow, and realized afterwards I should have masked the tires first, because gloss paint over flat primer without misting it on will result in (1) paint film shrinkage and (2) cracks in the gloss color coat.  Several of the tires therefore had radial cracks in the flat black applied over the tires, requiring minute but difficult touch up.   This is just an "old man who knows better by experience" afterthought for y'all for future efforts.   I had used a circle cutter for the first time to make yellow masking tape discs to mask off the wheels, and that part actually worked pretty well.  

After the vehicle chassis had dried a few days, I pressed the wheels on the axles.  In retrospect I'd HIGHLY recommend you test fit first to ensure they will press over the axle boss... I almost destroyed the trailer with the amount of pressure I applied, and this was not necessary. 

Using some clear plastic from a vacform blister container from Eduard (save these for "free" clear sheets!) ensured I had glass in the rear and side cab locations.  I left the door panel glass "rolled down" (you younger guys don't know what I am talking about, huh?) and tried to "force form" a windshield.  No go... but it's mostly there. 

You may want to do this yourself with a vacform and rudimentary balsa armature.  But maybe not.  I don't see any aftermarket showing up over this anytime soon.

I did not apply the decals, as I'm still searching for detail pictures showing this truck being used on a flight line with large aircraft.  In the interim, I have a 1/48 tanker to use for a visiting B-36 to be refueled.  My experience with Atlantis decals is they work great... but I don't need a Sinclair decal on my AGE fuel truck. 

 

Well done Atlantis, and please continue to bring out the older kits.   I'm preordering when possible... and the prices are particularly welcome, especially in cases such as the T-56 Turboprop... It's great fun to enjoy the hobby again with some good-'ol old time modeling. 

Q-Men JF-20 Mighty Dragon Q-Plane Series 01

IPMS/USA Reviews - Mon, 07/13/2020 - 23:58
Product Image Review Author:  Allan Murrell Kitty Hawk

Q-Men (part of Kitty Hawk) has released an Egg plane type kit with a Lego Style figure Pilot. This of the latest Chinese 5th Gen fighter the JF-20 Mighty Dragon. The kit can be built in one of two schemes.

In the box is; 

  • 2 x Bright red and grey Sprues
  • 1 x Clear Sprue
  • 1 x Green Sprue
  • 1 x Decal sheet
  • 1 x 3D printed Pilot head
  • 1x Instruction booklet

The sprues are well molded with no flash and great surface detail. The 3D printed pilot head is a great addition to the Lego style figure included.

Construction:

This is a very simple and straightforward build.

First is the construction of the fuselage and tail. The cockpit is minimal with just decals to add details. There was no color callout for the cockpit but from the internet pictures it appears to be dark grey so I painted it that way. You do need to be very careful installing parts B5/B7 and B6/B4 as they need to be aligned to ensure no visible gaps once assembled.

Next is the landing gear and underside details. Parts B9 and B10 are opposite to the way they should be installed. The front landing gear hole needs to be enlarged for installation. The Lego style figure is next to be assembled, and the only thing to do is enlarge the hole in the head to be able to install it correctly.  

The decals are next and are very good quality.

I didn't need to paint much as I wanted the Bright red version commemorating the anniversary of the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army. The only painting I did was the cockpit, the bright metallic red details, and the pilot's boots 

Summary

This was a very nice, simple kit and was fun to build. I will now look for more in this series for my stash.

Thanks go to Q-Men for providing this kit to review and IPMS USA for allowing me to review it.

Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix Car and its Variants

IPMS/USA Reviews - Mon, 07/13/2020 - 23:23
Product Image Review Author:  Frank Landrus Pen & Sword

The origin of Pen and Sword Books is closely linked with its sister company, the Barnsley Chronicle; one of the UK's oldest provincial newspapers - established in 1858 - and one of the few weeklies still in private ownership.  The first books published by the company were in response to public demand following of a series of articles published in the newspaper:- Dark Peak Aircraft Wrecks told the story of crash sites in the Dark Peak area of the Peak District National Park, and a further weekly feature on the history of two Kitchener battalions, known as the Barnsley Pals, aroused a thirst for more information. Following on from the success of Dark Peak Wrecks and Barnsley Pals books, a number of local history paperbacks were produced along with a series of battlefield guide books. Battleground Europe proved immediately successful and as more and more titles were produced the company made the decision to launch a book publishing arm of the group.  The company acquired the Leo Cooper military history imprint and "Pen and Sword" was born. Leo Cooper, the husband of the famous novelist Jilly, had established a strong reputation for publishing military history titles and had some famous books in his list. With the Leo Cooper imprint and its backlist, Pen and Sword became established as one of the UK's leading military history publishers.  With over 350 books published every year, Pen and Sword has established itself as a specialist book publisher.

Lance Cole is a journalist and the author of over a dozen books. He has written features and news items for many of the major automotive and aviation titles. He has also been a columnist with the Daily Telegraph, The Independent and the South China Post. A former Sir William Lyons Scholar, and national press columnist, Lance is also a trained designer, photographer and illustrator. His books include Bugatti Blue, Vickers VC10, Secrets of the Spitfire, Saab Cars, and The Classic Car Adventure. Lance has worked in car design and he has restored several classic cars. He has off-road and 4x4 driving experience in Jeeps and Land-Rovers in Africa and Australia.

Pen and Sword Books first entry in this new Car Craft series is a square back soft cover includes 64 gloss paper pages. Future volumes in this series will feature the Jaguar E-Series and the Porche 911.  The cover features color photographs of Amalgam's 1/8 Type 35 (Top), the twin filler caps of the Type 51 (Center Left), Mike Marshall's Type 35 in action (Center Middle), the wider radiator of later Bugattis (Center Right), and a color profile of Rene Dreyfus' Bugatti Type 35B that won the 1930 Monaco Grand Prix.  The rear cover features three models of the Bugatti, including the Amalgam 1/8 Type 35 
(Top), the Art Auto 1/8 Type 35 (Center), and the Airfix 1/32 Type 35B.  I counted 93 color pictures and 39 black and white photographs. There are also twelve color illustrations, primarily side profiles, by Charles Duggan.

The Bugatti Type 35 was first introduced to racing at the August 3, 1924 Grand Prix of Lyon.  An evolution of the Bugatti Type 13 Brescia, the Type 35 was by far the most successful Bugatti racer.  In its heyday, the Bugatti was winning an average of 14 races a week that led to the Bugatti winning over 1,000 races in its career.  The Bugatti Type 35 won the Targa Florio five years in a row from 1925 through 1929, an open road endurance race through the mountains of Sicily.

The sections include:

Introduction 

Original: The Brilliant Bugattis

A Bugatti Car 

Type 13 to Brescia

Brescia - The Precursor

Design by Detail

Body & Chassis [Page 11]

Wheels

Detailing

Engine

Suspension

Steering

Brakes

Development & Variants

Bugatti Type 35 and Derivatives / Variants 1924-1931

Type 35 2.0 litre

Type 35A 2.0 litre

Type 35C 2.0 litre Supercharged

Type 35T  2.3 litre

Type 35TC/Type B 2.3 litre Supercharged

Type 37 1.5 litre, Four Cylinder

Type 37A 1.5 litre, Four Cylinder Supercharged

Type 39 1.5 litre, Eight Cylinder

Type 39A 1.5 litre, Eight Cylinder Supercharged

Type 43 2.3 litre, Eight Cylinder Supercharged

Type 51 2.3 litre, Eight Cylinder Supercharged

Type 54

Type 59

Technical Specification Bugatti Type 35B

Motor Sport Legend

The Famous Drivers Who Drove These Cars To Success Included: [Table]

Women at the Wheel

Snapshot of Key Events in the Type 35's Motor Sport Record

'Genie' [Page 33]

Color Illustrations by Charles Duggan [Page 39]

Amalgram Collection (Bristol, UK) Bugatti Type 35 (1926) 1/8 Scale [Page 43]

Art Auto Collection (J-P Fontenelle, Vichy, France) Bugatti Type 35 (1934) 1/8 Scale

Monogram (USA) Bugatti Type 35B 1/24 Scale

Revival (Italy) Bugatti Type 35B 1/20 Scale

Modeling the Bugatti [Page 59]

Type 35 Models [Table]

Acknowledgements / References

I found it quite interesting that the Bugatti Type 35 was not an inexpensive car for its day.  Only the very well to-do could afford a Bugatti racer as they were priced at the cost of a very large home in London.  That's not to say that you couldn't get a Bugatti that looked like the Type 35 as Ettore Bugatti did not hesitate to sell a less powerful and cheaper version to those that just had to have one.

Lance Cole kicks off Pen & Sword's new Car Craft series with an excellent overview of the Bugatti Type 35.  He ably addresses the design and development of the Bugatti Type 35 followed by coverage of the Type's dominance in racing that would not be eclipsed for decades.  Cole also covers the Type 35 variations and development offshoots, some that had success, some that failed.  Those devoted to the Type 35 continue their love even today where Bugatti's are still raced despite their rarity.  Cole also covers all of the major models of the Type 35 from the expensive 1/8 scale metal kits to the Airfix and Monogram injected kits.  The combination of color and period black and white photographs provides plenty of material for the Type 35 modeler.  I was able to read this easily over three nights.  The modeler is well served as there is a good ratio of action and detail photographs of the Bugatti Type 35.

My thanks to Pen & Sword Books Ltd., Casemate Publishing, and IPMS/USA for the chance to review this great book.

Highly recommended!

Preview: HK Models ahead by a nose on the new "Nose Art" kit of their 32nd scale Lancaster

The Modelling News - Mon, 07/13/2020 - 07:42
Hong Kong Models has launched their nose into the market with an all-new kit of the Lancaster - but this is something different... If you are one of those modellers who want the 32nd scale Lancaster but do not have the space or the cash - well you can now get the nose section released as a single kit in large scale with all the drama but a 3rd of the space. See more about it in our preview...
Read on... »

Trumpeter 1/32nd scale F-105G Wild Weasel

New Forum Posts - Sun, 07/12/2020 - 21:07
Well, the last time that I built a F-105G, I was in the 6th grade. Man, she’s a BIG one. A good friend of mine in our club gave this to me to build. It came in a box the size of a small suitcase. The assembly on this one is relatively straightforward. I’ve purchased an Aires cockpit, with all the Fixin’s. Chris

Looking for 1/35 pots and pans to add to armor

New Forum Posts - Sun, 07/12/2020 - 17:37
Been looking for a source of 1/35 pots, pan and coffee pots either in plastic, resin or white metal. I've previously had used H & R metals but can't find anyone who carries the line. Did find their website but minimum order is $25 and I don't need that much stuff. Tried asking on an other forum and people have mentioned Miniart but their sets don't have what I'm looking for (plus the price to buy a set for one item is not practical). Didn't someone make a field kitchen kit in 1/35? If so, did it included pots and pans? Someone also mentioned some doll house stuff is close to 54mm size but it seems like all I can locate is 1/24 or larger doll house furnishings. Anyone know of a good source? Eric

1 new photo (July 12)

New Gallery Images - Sun, 07/12/2020 - 16:00